About

Photo credit: Cathy VanSchwartz Seith

G. M. Lupo Press Kit

G. M. Lupo is a native of Atlanta where he has always had a dysfunctional relationship with his hometown. He currently resides in Middle Georgia, near where his Lupo ancestors lived nearly two hundred years ago.

His most recent published work is the story collection Reconstruction (2020), part of his series of Atlanta Stories, which includes Fables of the New South (2017). Along with his novel, Rebecca, Too (2018), these constitute his Expanded Universe of Fictional Atlanta. He has also released a collection of essays, poetry, and stories entitled Words Words Words (2020).

Most recent performances of his scripted work include Opposites Detract, which premiered at Amplifest, Merely Players Presents (Doraville, GA), May 2019, and A Debt to Play, which had its premiere at Tapas III, Academy Theatre (Hapeville, GA), June 2018. Merely Players Presents also sponsored a reading of his work in progress, Rebecca, Too, in July 2020, via Zoom.

He was the winner of the 2017 Essential Theatre Play Writing Award for his full-length play Another Mother, which had its world premiere in his home neighborhood of West End in August 2017, in the building that once housed the library where he learned to read as a child.

He is a member of the Dramatists Guild, Merely Writers, and the Independent Book Publishers Association.

Interviews, Media, and Reviews

SmartCherrysThoughts

Shoutout Atlanta

South Branch Scribbler

VoyageATL

Review of Fables of the New South on Book Review Directory

NFReads.com

The Mordant Scribe

Another Mother page at The Essential Theatre (Atlanta, GA)

The Goats, adaptation of Got Your Goat by Decent Humans

2 thoughts on “About

  1. Dear Mr. Lupo

    In your research on names carved into Stone Mountain, have you come across George Washington Lee? He was from “Gibraltar” (later renamed Stone Mountain) and his father Drewry was the first postmaster. George would later be the controversial Confederate Provost Marshal of Atlanta. I have written quite a bit on him. Any help is appreciated.

    1. I haven’t run across him. Mainly I take pictures of any carvings I can find then try to look them up at Ancestry and other online sources. Some are easier to find than others. There’s a carving with a cluster of names carved around 1879 about halfway to the top, which I haven’t been able to match with anyone. However, I’ll keep an eye out for the name. Thanks!

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