To Script or not to Script

Times Square, NYC, sometime around 1989. With the closing of the theaters due to Covid-19, opportunities for playwrights, and, especially, emerging playwrights have become few and far between. There have been many readings and performances staged for Zoom and other conference platforms, but it will most likely be a very long time before performing venues … Continue reading To Script or not to Script

Abel Cone, D. 1843, Houston County, GA

Abel Cone first appears on the census, as head of a household, in 1830 in Washington County, Georgia, and he's listed as between 20 and 29. Near him on the census are Levi Cone (age 30-39) and Thomas Cone (age 20-29) who are also listed as heads of households. In his household are also two … Continue reading Abel Cone, D. 1843, Houston County, GA

Events of 1985, Collins Family

Reverend Aaron Abel Collins, pastor at the Edgewood African Methodist Episcopal Congregation of Atlanta, is considered a mighty man of God by his parishioners. His congregation numbers around four hundred and fifty active members with significant neighborhood outreach, making the Reverend an influential voice in his community. As a young Theology student at Morris Brown, … Continue reading Events of 1985, Collins Family

Rebecca, Too, The Ghost Queen

It is late-summer, 1965, and Sarah Rosales is going to Atlanta. She’s eighteen, recently graduated high school, and on a Greyhound bus to Agnes Scott College in the suburbs of town, where she’s enrolled as a freshman. Sarah, the second of four daughters of Benjamin and Esther Rosales of Charleston, South Carolina, is the first … Continue reading Rebecca, Too, The Ghost Queen

The Handmaiden

Leah Walker steps up to the door of Rosalind Duchard’s home in Cambridge, Massachusetts and rings the bell. She’s there to meet with Rosalind and her husband, Paul, about a request they made of her at a previous meeting. Leah is still undecided on what her answer will be, but Rosalind has promised to have … Continue reading The Handmaiden

Ned Branch

Edward Abraham Branch, III, called “Ned” by his family to distinguish him from his grandfather, “Big Ed” and his father, still called “Eddie, Jr.” despite the elder Edward being dead for ten years, carried on the fine tradition of Branch men playing football at UGA. A quarterback, Ned was a natural player, and, as such, … Continue reading Ned Branch